December 21, 2017

Red State Democrats Voted Against Bonuses For Thousands Of Their Voters

Red State Democrats Voted Against Bonuses For Thousands Of Their Voters

Before Congressional Republicans passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, they told the American people that it would be a gigantic boon for the U.S. economy and for Americans’ financial security. Now, less than 24 hours after this historic tax bill passed, Congressional Republicans are already seeing their promises come to fruition:

“U.S. stocks opened higher on Thursday after some companies said they would spend the savings stemming from lower corporate taxes on higher wages and new construction… NBCUniversal and CNBC parent Comcast, as well as Boeing AT&T and Wells Fargo, announced higher pay and bonuses for workers. They also announced other spending measures.”

Perhaps the most notable example of the immediate positive impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act’s passage is AT&T’s decision to give a $1,000 bonus to 200,000 of its employees, as a result of the bill.

AT&T’s move also means that red state Senators are now on record as opposing giving a significant bonus to thousands of their constituents:

  • Senator Joe Donnelly voted against giving potentially 4,500 Hoosiers a $1,000 bonus.
  • Senator Claire McCaskill voted against giving potentially 9,400 Missourians a $1,000 bonus.
  • Senator Sherrod Brown voted against giving potentially 6,000 Ohioans a $1,000 bonus.
  • Senator Jon Tester voted against giving potentially 780 Montanans a $1,000 bonus.
  • Senator Bill Nelson voted against giving potentially 14,500 Floridians a $1,000 bonus.
  • Senator Bob Casey voted against giving potentially 2,200 Pennsylvanians a $1,000 bonus.
  • Senator Joe Manchin voted against giving potentially 950 West Virginians a $1,000 bonus.
  • Senator Heidi Heitkamp voted against giving potentially 190 North Dakotans a $1,000 bonus.
  • Senator Tammy Baldwin voted against giving potentially 2,700 Wisconsinites a $1,000 bonus.
  • Senator Debbie Stabenow voted against giving potentially 7,100 Michiganders a $1,000 bonus.

Next year, at the ballot box, these ten red state Senators will have to answer for the fact that they wanted to deny their voters these significant benefits.